A Pause of Thought by Christina Rossetti

A Pause of Thought by Christina Rossetti

Christina Rossetti A Pause of Thought by Christina Rossetti I looked for that which is not, nor can be, And hope deferred made my heart sick in truth: But years…
The Figure-Head by Herman Melville

The Figure-Head by Herman Melville

The Figure-Head by Herman Melville The Charles-and-Emma seaward sped, (Named from the carven pair at prow,) He so smart, and a curly head, She tricked forth as a bride knows…
Nightingales by Robert Bridges

Nightingales by Robert Bridges

Nightingales Robert Bridges Beautiful must be the mountains whence ye come, And bright in the fruitful valleys the streams, wherefrom Ye learn your song: Where are those starry woods? O…
Only A Woman’s Hair by Lewis Carroll

Only A Woman’s Hair by Lewis Carroll

Only A Woman's Hair by Lewis Carroll Only a woman's hair! Fling it aside! A bubble on Life's mighty stream: Heed it not, man, but watch the broadening tide Bright…
Revolutions by Matthew Arnold

Revolutions by Matthew Arnold

Revolutions by Matthew Arnold Before man parted for this earthly strand, While yet upon the verge of heaven he stood, God put a heap of letters in his hand, And…
One Day by Rupert Brooke

One Day by Rupert Brooke

One Day by Rupert Brooke Today I have been happy. All the day I held the memory of you, and wove Its laughter with the dancing light o' the spray,…
Far Off-Shore by Herman Melville

Far Off-Shore by Herman Melville

Far Off-Shore by Herman Melville Look, the raft, a signal flying, Thin a shred; None upon the lashed spars lying, Quick or dead. Cries the sea-fowl, hovering over, "Crew, the…
“LUCY” by Oliver Wendell Holmes

“LUCY” by Oliver Wendell Holmes

"LUCY" by Oliver Wendell Holmes   "Lucy." The old familiar name Is now, as always, pleasant, Its liquid melody the same Alike in past or present; Let others call you…
Beauty and Beauty by Rupert Brooke

Beauty and Beauty by Rupert Brooke

  Beauty and Beauty by Rupert Brooke When Beauty and Beauty meet All naked, fair to fair, The earth is crying-sweet, And scattering-bright the air, Eddying, dizzying, closing round, With…
In Flanders Fields by John McCrae

In Flanders Fields by John McCrae

John McCrae by William Notman and Son In Flanders Fields by John McCrae In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and…
A Valentine by Lewis Carroll

A Valentine by Lewis Carroll

A Valentine by Lewis Carroll And cannot pleasures, while they last, Be actual unless, when past, They leave us shuddering and aghast, With anguish smarting And cannot friends be firm…
The Night March by Herman Melville

The Night March by Herman Melville

Herman Melville   The Night March by Herman Melville With banners furled and clarions mute, An army passes in the night; And beaming spears and helms salute The dark with…
To Milton by Oscar Wilde

To Milton by Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde by Napoleon Sarony from Library Congress   To Milton by Oscar Wilde Milton! I think thy spirit hath passed away From these white cliffs and high-embattled towers; This…
The Sleeper by Edgar Allan Poe

The Sleeper by Edgar Allan Poe

The Sleeper by Edgar Allan Poe At midnight, in the month of June, I stand beneath the mystic moon. An opiate vapor, dewy, dim, Exhales from out her golden rim,…
The West Wind by William Cullen Bryant

The West Wind by William Cullen Bryant

  The West Wind by William Cullen Bryant It's a warm wind, the west wind, full of birds' cries; I never hear the west wind but tears are in my…
The Hero by Siegfried Sassoon

The Hero by Siegfried Sassoon

The Hero by Siegfried Sassoon "Jack fell as he'd have wished," the Mother said, And folded up the letter that she'd read. "The Colonel writes so nicely." Something broke In…
Conversation Galante by T. S. Eliot

Conversation Galante by T. S. Eliot

Conversation Galante by T. S. Eliot I observe: “Our sentimental friend the moon! Or possibly (fantastic, I confess) It may be Prester John’s balloon Or an old battered lantern hung…
XXVI by Emily Dickinson

XXVI by Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson XXVI. The farthest thunder that I heard Was nearer than the sky, And rumbles still, though torrid noons Have lain their missiles by. The lightning that preceded it…
The Past-Present by Walt Whitman

The Past-Present by Walt Whitman

The Past-Present by Walt Whitman I was looking a long while for the history of the past for myself, and for these chants and now I have found it. It…
The Three Kings By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Three Kings By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Three Kings by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Three Kings came riding from far away, Melchior and Gaspar and Baltasar; Three Wise Men out of the East were they, And they…
A Christmas Carol by James Russell Lowell

A Christmas Carol by James Russell Lowell

A Christmas Carol by James Russell Lowell "What means this glory round our feet," The Magi mused, "more bright than morn?" And voices chanted clear and sweet, "To-day the Prince…
The Death of Robin Hood by Eugene Field

The Death of Robin Hood by Eugene Field

The Death of Robin Hood ?by Eugene Field "Give me my bow," said Robin Hood, "An arrow give to me; And where 't is shot mark thou that spot, For…
Ballade of Christmas by Andrew Lang

Ballade of Christmas by Andrew Lang

Ballade of Christmas by Andrew Lang Between the moonlight and the fire In winter twilights long ago, What ghosts we raised for your desire, To make your merry blood run…
CHRISTMAS BELLS by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

CHRISTMAS BELLS by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

CHRISTMAS BELLS by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow   I heard the bells on Christmas Day Their old, familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth,…
Each and All By Ralph Waldo Emerson

Each and All By Ralph Waldo Emerson

Each and All ?By Ralph Waldo Emerson Little thinks, in the field, yon red-cloaked clown Of thee from the hill-top looking down; The heifer that lows in the upland farm,…
Ode to a Nightingale by John Keats

Ode to a Nightingale by John Keats

? Ode to a Nightingale ?by John Keats 1. My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull…
City of Ships by Walt Whitman

City of Ships by Walt Whitman

City of Ships ?by Walt Whitman ? City of ships! (O the black ships! O the fierce ships! O the beautiful, sharp-bowed steam-ships and sail-ships!) City of the world! (for…
THE PROBLEM by Ralph Waldo Emerson

THE PROBLEM by Ralph Waldo Emerson

? THE PROBLEM by Ralph Waldo Emerson I like a church; I like a cowl; I love a prophet of the soul; And on my heart monastic aisles Fall like…
The Poor Ghost by Christina Rossetti

The Poor Ghost by Christina Rossetti

? The Poor Ghost by Christina Rossetti "Oh whence do you come, my dear friend, to me, With your golden hair all fallen below your knee, And your face as…
The Haunted Palace by Edgar Allan Poe

The Haunted Palace by Edgar Allan Poe

The Haunted Palace by Edgar Allan Poe In the greenest of our valleys By good angels tenanted, Once a fair and stately palace? Radiant palace?reared its head. In the monarch…
THE NINE LITTLE GOBLINS by James Whitcomb Riley

THE NINE LITTLE GOBLINS by James Whitcomb Riley

THE NINE LITTLE GOBLINS by James Whitcomb Riley They all climbed up on a high board-fence? Nine little Goblins, with green-glass eyes? Nine little Goblins that had no sense, And…
The Haunted Oak by Paul Laurence Dunbar

The Haunted Oak by Paul Laurence Dunbar

THE HAUNTED OAK by Paul Laurence Dunbar Pray why are you so bare, so bare, Oh, bough of the old oak-tree; And why, when I go through the shade you…
THE VAMPIRE by Rudyard Kipling

THE VAMPIRE by Rudyard Kipling

THE VAMPIRE by Rudyard Kipling (The verses?as suggested by the painting by Philip Burne Jones, first exhibited at the new gallery in London in 1897.) . A fool there was…
The Kraken by Lord Alfred Tennyson

The Kraken by Lord Alfred Tennyson

The Kraken by Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892) Below the thunders of the upper deep, Far, far beneath in the abysmal sea, His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep The Kraken sleepeth: faintest…
THAT THE NIGHT COME by W. B. Yeats

THAT THE NIGHT COME by W. B. Yeats

THAT THE NIGHT COME by W. B. Yeats She lived in storm and strife. Her soul had such desire For what proud death may bring That it could not endure…
THE LOOKING-GLASS BY RUDYARD KIPLING

THE LOOKING-GLASS BY RUDYARD KIPLING

Rudyard Kipling THE LOOKING-GLASS by RUDYARD KIPLING The Queen was in her chamber, and she was middling old, Her petticoat was of satin, and her stomacher was gold. Backwards and…
Sleepy Hollow by William Ellery Channing

Sleepy Hollow by William Ellery Channing

William Ellery Channing (1818 ?1901) SLEEPY HOLLOW No abbey's gloom, nor dark cathedral-stoops, No winding torches paint the midnight air; Here the green pines delight, the aspen droops Along the…
Kin to Sorrow by Edna St. Vincent Millay

Kin to Sorrow by Edna St. Vincent Millay

Kin to Sorrow by Edna St. Vincent Millay Am I kin to Sorrow, That so oft Falls the knocker of my door? Neither loud nor soft, But as long accustomed,…
The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore? While I nodded,…
A PORTRAIT by Nathaniel Parker Willis

A PORTRAIT by Nathaniel Parker Willis

A PORTRAIT by Nathaniel Parker Willis She was not very beautiful, if it be beauty's test To match a classic model when perfectly at rest; And she did not look…
The Foresaken by William Wordsworth

The Foresaken by William Wordsworth

The Foresaken By William Wordsworth THE peace which others seek they find; The heaviest storms not longest last; Heaven grants even to the guiltiest mind An amnesty for what is…
HUSH’D BE THE CAMPS TO-DAY by Walt Whitman

HUSH’D BE THE CAMPS TO-DAY by Walt Whitman

HUSH'D BE THE CAMPS TO-DAY by Walt Whitman (May 4, 1865) Hush'd be the camps to-day, And soldiers let us drape our war-worn weapons, And each with musing soul retire…
To One in Paradise by Edgar Allan Poe

To One in Paradise by Edgar Allan Poe

? To One in Paradise by Edgar Allan Poe Thou wast that all to me, love, For which my soul did pine? A green isle in the sea, love, A…
THE WORLD’S TRIUMPHS by Matthew Arnold

THE WORLD’S TRIUMPHS by Matthew Arnold

? THE WORLD'S TRIUMPHS by Matthew Arnold So far as I conceive the world's rebuke To him address'd who would recast her new, Not from herself her fame of strength…
XI.by Emily Dickinson

XI.by Emily Dickinson

XI. by Emily Dickinson Much madness is divinest sense To a discerning eye; Much sense the starkest madness. 'T is the majority In this, as all, prevails. Assent, and you…
A Sea Dirge by Lewis Carroll

A Sea Dirge by Lewis Carroll

A SEA DIRGE ?There are certain things - as, a spider, a ghost, The income-tax, gout, an umbrella for three - That I hate, but the thing that I hate…
To Papa by Louis M. Alcott

To Papa by Louis M. Alcott

Louis May Alcott (1832 -1888) TO PAPA by Louisa M. Alcott In high Olympus' sacred shade A gift Minerva wrought For her beloved philosopher Immersed in deepest thought. A shield…
TO THE LAKE by Edgar Allan Poe

TO THE LAKE by Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) TO THE LAKE In Spring of youth it was my lot To haunt of the wide world a spot The which I could not love the…
Tears Fall In My Heart by Paul Verlaine

Tears Fall In My Heart by Paul Verlaine

Paul Verlaine (1844-1896) Tears Fall In My Heart by Paul Verlaine Tears fall in my heart Rain falls on the town; what is this numb hurt that enters my heart?…
Farewell to the Muse by Sir Walter Scott

Farewell to the Muse by Sir Walter Scott

? Sir Walter Scott???( 1771 ? 1832) Farewell to the Muse ?by Sir Walter Scott? ? ?? ? ? Enchantress, farewell, who so oft hast decoy'd me, At the close…
IN THE MILE END ROAD by Amy Levy

IN THE MILE END ROAD by Amy Levy

IN THE MILE END ROAD ?by Amy Levy How like her! But 'tis she herself, Comes up the crowded street, How little did I think, the morn, My only love…
X. Emily Dickinson

X. Emily Dickinson

X. I died for beauty, but was scarce Adjusted in the tomb, When one who died for truth was lain In an adjoining room. He questioned softly why I failed?…
Gunga Din by Rudyard Kipling

Gunga Din by Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Gunga Din You may talk o' gin and beer When you're quartered safe out 'ere, An' you're sent to penny-fights an' Aldershot it; But when it comes…
Winter In The Boulevard by D.H. Lawrence

Winter In The Boulevard by D.H. Lawrence

Lawrence (1885?1930) Winter In The Boulevard by Lawrence The frost has settled down upon the trees And ruthlessly strangled off the fantasies Of leaves that have gone unnoticed, swept like…
A VALENTINE by Lewis Carroll

A VALENTINE by Lewis Carroll

A VALENTINE by Lewis Carroll And cannot pleasures, while they last, Be actual unless, when past, They leave us shuddering and aghast, With anguish smarting? And cannot friends be firm…
The World-Soul by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The World-Soul by Ralph Waldo Emerson

The World-Soul by Ralph Waldo Emerson Thanks to the morning light, Thanks to the foaming sea, To the uplands of New Hampshire, To the green-haired forest free; Thanks to each…
Those Who Love by Sara Teasdale

Those Who Love by Sara Teasdale

Those Who Love by Sara Teasdale Those who love the most Do not talk of their love; Francesca, Guenevere, Dierdre, Iseult, Heloise In the fragrant gardens of heaven Are silent,…
The Tempest by James T. Fields

The Tempest by James T. Fields

James T. Fields (1817-1881) The Tempest We were crowded in the cabin, Not a soul would dare to sleep, It was midnight on the waters, And a storm was on…
A REBEL by John Gould Fletcher

A REBEL by John Gould Fletcher

A REBEL by John Gould Fletcher (1886-1950) Tie a bandage over his eyes, And at his feet Let rifles drearily patter Their death-prayers of defeat. Throw a blanket over his…
Mist by Henry David Thoreau

Mist by Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Mist by Henry David Thoreau Low-anchored cloud, Newfoundland air, Fountain head and source of rivers, Dew-cloth, dream drapery, And napkin spread by fays; Drifting meadow of…
To Myself by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

To Myself by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browing (1806-1861) To Myself Let nothing make thee sad or fretful, Or too regretful; Be still; What God hath ordered must be right; Then find in it thine…
Fragment by Edwin Arlington Robinson

Fragment by Edwin Arlington Robinson

About Edwin Robinson: Born at Head Tide, Maine, Dec. 22, 1869. Educated at Harvard University. Mr. Robinson is a psychological poet of great subtlety; his poems are usually studies of…
PORTRAIT OF A MACHINE by Louis Untermeyer

PORTRAIT OF A MACHINE by Louis Untermeyer

PORTRAIT OF A MACHINE by Louis Untermeyer What nudity is beautiful as this Obedient monster purring at its toil; These naked iron muscles dripping oil And the sure-fingered rods that…
THE MOON by William H. Davies

THE MOON by William H. Davies

According to his own biography, William H. Davies was born in a public-house called Church House at Newport, in the County of Monmouthshire, April 20, 1870, of Welsh parents. He…
THE NEVERMORE by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

THE NEVERMORE by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828-1882) THE NEVERMORE by Dante Gabriel Rossetti Look in my face; my name is Might-have-been; I am also called No-more, Too-late, Farewell; Unto thine ear I hold…
SORROWS AND JOYS by George Meredith

SORROWS AND JOYS by George Meredith

George Meredith 1828-1909 SORROWS AND JOYS Bury thy sorrows, and they shall rise As souls to the immortal skies, And there look down like mothers' eyes. But let thy joys…
The Soldier’s Wife by Robert Southey

The Soldier’s Wife by Robert Southey

Robert Southey (1774-1843) The Soldier's Wife by Robert Southey Weary way-wanderer languid and sick at heart Travelling painfully over the rugged road, Wild-visag'd Wanderer! ah for thy heavy chance! Sorely…
The Last Leaf by Oliver Wendell Holmes

The Last Leaf by Oliver Wendell Holmes

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894) The Last Leaf by Oliver Wendell Holmes I saw him once before, As he passed by the door, And again The pavement stones resound, As he…
The Spider And The Fly by Mary Howitt

The Spider And The Fly by Mary Howitt

Mary Howitt? (1799-1888) The Spider And The Fly "Will you walk into my parlor?" said the spider to the fly; "'Tis the prettiest little parlor that ever you may spy.…