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Author Topic: poetry and the internet  (Read 2315 times)

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Richard

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poetry and the internet
« on: April 11, 2009, 07:50:21 PM »
http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/poetry/article6044758.ece an article making a case for use the web for your poetry. I think everyone does this now. Do you post your poetry online? Many magazines won't publish it if it has appeared anywhere else, including a myspace or facebook what do you think?

banana_the_poet

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Re: poetry and the internet
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2009, 05:39:27 PM »
I think magazines that refuse to publish a poem if it has been published on the internet are being very short sighted.
It is hard enough to sell magazines these days as it is.  I wouldn't even bother to submit to a publication with those criteria and I expect I am not alone in that.  I certainly wouldn't buy or subscribe to such a magazine.

But isn't the whole point of poetry magazines to have a very tiny circle of people who consider themselves extremely clever and sophisticated constantly patting each other on the back for understanding something everyone else is too dumb to understand?

Hopefully not, but that is the impression I have always got.

I have never submitted a poem to a magazine and doubt I ever will - I don't think I am at all the sort of 'poet' they would welcome onto their pages - previously published or not.  :D

I had one included in an anthology published by Macmillan once though and I bought 6 copies to give my closest relatives.  I think that will be the pinnacle of my poetic career.  8)
« Last Edit: April 12, 2009, 05:44:50 PM by banana_the_poet »

Richard

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Re: poetry and the internet
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2009, 06:25:49 PM »
I am a little afraid of both views. I think that the idea that poetry magazines are only for a select few elites, is a little dated. At one time, and in some circles it is true. We have to remember that is what it became because of some short sighted people. At one time poetry was sought after and very popular. TS Eliot, no one seems to remember, performed in front of large, very large crowds not unlike our modern pop stars. His circle, and ones like him, Pound, and Stein, and Cummings and many others, were of course elitist, if they hadn't been they wouldn't have been able to do what they did, but they were also lovers of the work, works, written words. They believed in brining beauty to the world. It might sound cliched, but isn't it the right of people to be exposed to something wonderful.

The university elite that you are speaking (or whom I guess you are speaking about) are quickly fading, and the internet is brining a place to people, for people to create and share work anew. I agree that if poetry magazines limit what they take, they are foregoing the true meaning of sharing work. Sometimes it is a rights issue.

On the other side, I see people not believing in sharing their work, or that it isn't valuable. This of course couldn't be less true. Poetry is valuable. It is art, and just because some think it is easy, doesn't make it the case. It is hard, and it takes skill, and it is worth a great deal. Everything should be done to further the exposure of writers and those who would bring their work to us. If you write poetry, you should publish your work, submit it, and let others read it, and you should support all those who do the same. It shouldn't happen in small circles. Do you see that millions and millions of people are just like you, and if they all got together, and showed their appreciation of poetry, there wouldn't be any trouble in supporting poets. It shouldn't be small circles of people who say this is a good poem, it should masses and masses of people who write and love poetry supporting each other. This is coming, what if you could buy a collection of poetry for 1$. How many would you buy? Would you buy 2 or 10 a week to support other poets? If you published your collection of poetry in an ebook, what percentage of those millions and millions of writers would you need to buy a work, before you could devote yourself to the craft?

I guess that's the way I see it. Also, Banana I've read your work on this board, and it is a shame if you don't share it with as many people as you can. I tend to think that poets and writers are a little better than everyone else (those who do not write) and I don't mean, great poets or great writers, I mean all poets and writers.

banana_the_poet

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Re: poetry and the internet
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2009, 09:03:27 PM »
Thank you for your kind words about my poems.

I think I will stick to the internet as a place to 'publish' my poems.  I don't think I am writing for other poets particularly, as much as for people in general.  I don't think people in general read poetry magazines.

When I started my first poetry blog, I didn't expect anyone to visit and used to get excited if even one person turned up to read my stuff.  A comment was cause for celebration  :)

These days I get between 100 - 250 people a day on my main funny poetry blog and during February with Valentines Day, I actually got 4,000 people on my blog in one day! 

So with Twitter and my blog, I am fairly chuffed at the readership I get.

I am about to start recording spoken word 'performance' versions and sung versions of the ones that really are lyrics rather than poems.

I am a very independent sort of person and a lot of a control freak, so the thought of submitting my poetry to an editor and all the legal complications that are involved and the 'processes' and protocols just throw a brick wall in front of me, psychologically.

I am used to making things happen for myself.

The younger computer savvy generation are cut from the same cloth in the main as well.  So I think blogs, websites, forums, you tube, self publishing and self generated online 'radio' etc will be the way things go.

I'm not sure about supporting poets just for the sake of it.  I'd like to think I would be altruistic, but if I am to be honest I have very little money and don't even buy books any more.  I only spend money on food, shelter, clothing and transport and staying online.  If I was to buy a book it needs to be 'special' in some way, so that it is an object to be enjoyed as well as something with content.  So I wouldn't buy 'cheap' publications - I want a paper publication to be substantial and lasting and be passed down to grandchildren, the way my grand parents books have been passed down to me.

I'm waffling on far too long again.

Sorry to be so negative.  I'm a bit of an Eeyore  :-\

Bedtime now,

banana_the_poet

Father Luke

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Re: poetry and the internet
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2009, 01:35:13 AM »


On the other side, I see people not believing in sharing their work, or that it isn't valuable. This of course couldn't be less true. Poetry is valuable. It is art, and just because some think it is easy, doesn't make it the case. It is hard, and it takes skill, and it is worth a great deal. Everything should be done to further the exposure of writers and those who would bring their work to us. If you write poetry, you should publish your work, submit it, and let others read it, and you should support all those who do the same. It shouldn't happen in small circles. Do you see that millions and millions of people are just like you, and if they all got together, and showed their appreciation of poetry, there wouldn't be any trouble in supporting poets. It shouldn't be small circles of people who say this is a good poem, it should masses and masses of people who write and love poetry supporting each other. This is coming, what if you could buy a collection of poetry for 1$. How many would you buy? Would you buy 2 or 10 a week to support other poets? If you published your collection of poetry in an ebook, what percentage of those millions and millions of writers would you need to buy a work, before you could devote yourself to the craft?


Post of the year right there.

- -
Okay,
Father Luke

Chrisskoyles

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Re: poetry and the internet
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2009, 12:16:34 PM »
This is something that I've been really interested in lately. I've been going through a really creative spell and cranking out a lot of poems lately, but before I start to look at getting them published anywhere, I want to go back through the wealth of material I've ammassed over the years and do something with it.

There are a lot of poems I have that have either been rejected by publishers several times or that I don't have enough faith in to convince me that it's even worth sending to a publisher. That said, I do think it's a shame if nobody gets to read them because you never know, somebody might like them.

So I've been going through the back-log , picking up said poems and blasting them out into the internet.

There's a little website I found called 'authspot.com' that is actually powered by a publishing platform called 'Triond' (a great way to off-load all your cast-offs!) and I've just been using that to get some stuff out there.

I hope nobody would consider this to be spam of any kind if I posted a quick link to give you an idea of what I'm talking about. If so, would be OK with having this removed.

But feel free to let me know what you think:

http://www.authspot.com/Poetry/Good-Times.705813