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Colorado Review

Colorado Review
Colorado Review is committed to the publication of contemporary fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. We are equally interested in work by both new and established writers. CR does not publish genre fiction or short shorts (flash fiction), nor do we subscribe to a particular literary philosophy or school of poetry or fiction

Contemporary Literary Review: India

Contemporary Literary Review: India
Contemporary Literary Review: India (CLR: I) is the literary journal which brings in a mix of Life, Arts, Culture, and Literature that can make you a complete man you can proud on. You will find here poetry, stories, criticism, reviews, non-fiction, and other genre of the best quality of the time from around the world. Contemporary Literary Review: India is the online literary journal that guarantees you a cosy room where you need not rack your brain to pick up the best words for your writings and zip up the gibberish, or think twice to submit if you muddle between simple words. You express your mind at the best! That is the motto at Contemporary Literary Review: India. Recently it has started print version also. It brings the print version Quarterly.

Copaiba Literary Review

Copaiba Literary Review
The copaiba (pronounced co-pie-ba) is a tree that symbolizes vitality. Copaiba Press publishes a quarterly literary magazine and hosts workshops and other events to celebrate the vitality of our veterans and the communities they serve. Our mission is to document the truths of war and to seek peace and healing for veterans, their families, and everyone affected by conflict. Copaiba Press has no political agenda. Sure, ultimately we'd like to see world peace, but who wouldn't? We're not here to talk about policies or politics. We're here to celebrate good writing and to allow the voices of veterans and their family members to be heard. Nothing more, nothing less

Crazyhorse

Crazyhorse
Recent poems from Crazyhorse were selected for reprint in The Best American Poetry 2008 and 2007 and The Pushcart Prize anthology, recent fiction in The Best American Short Stories 2008. Richard Jackson?s poem ?Cain?s Legacy,? won a 2004 Pushcart Prize. Dinty W. Moore?s essay ?Son of Mr. Green Jeans,? was reprinted in the January 2004 Harper?s Magazine. Read excerpts online: http://crazyhorse.cofc.edu. Since 1960, Crazyhorse has published John Updike, Raymond Carver, Jorie Graham, John Ashbery, Robert Bly, Ha Jin, James Wright, Carolyn Forch?, Charles Simic, Lynda Hull, Charles Wright, Jean Valentine, and Billy Collins. Past authors have been reprinted in the annual Pushcart Prize and Best American anthologies, have won Pulitzer Prizes, the National Book Award, the O. Henry Prize, have been Guggenheim fellows and NEA Fellowship recipients.

Creative Nonfiction

Creative Nonfiction
Creative Nonfiction is the voice of the genre. Published since 1994 as a journal, in 2010 CNF adopted a larger magazine format that combines new creative nonfiction about a variety of topics with columns and features about the art, business and craft of the genre. Recent issues have included interviews with or new work by Susan Cheever, Dave Eggers, Phillip Lopate, Lauren Slater, Ruth Reichl and other well-known writers, as well as several never-before-published writers.

CutBank

CutBank
We?re proud of CutBank?s thirty-nine years as Montana?s foremost literary magazine, founded in 1973 by the Creative Writing program at the University of Montana and helmed initially by favorite literary son William Kittredge.

Digital Americana

Digital Americana Magazine is the first literary & culture magazine developed especially for the interactive tablet experience. Inside every issue are insightful articles, interviews, and of course, the best fiction. Featured extras include compelling short independent films, indie music, modern animation, comic illustration, and photography from talented artists around the world.

Do Not Look at the Sun

Do Not Look at the Sun
Short stories, poems, as well as notes, thoughts, diary entries and other words that have no place elsewhere. Words that have no business in literary journals or arts reviews, but words that nevertheless deserve to be heard: One-line poems, streams of thoughts and lucid dreams that have no outlet anywhere other than the pages of people's personal notebooks. It is misfit lit